"Libraries tend to become more cozy, relaxing and communicative places. Other than public spaces like museums, they have a certain private character, which makes them a living room for their community."

— CNN debunks the myth that libraries are dying. Complement with this wonderful photographic love letter to public libraries.  (via explore-blog)

fastcompany:

What Happens To Our Brains When We Exercise And How It Makes Us Happier
Most of us are aware of what happens to the body when we exercise. We build more muscle or more stamina. We feel how daily activities like climbing stairs becomes easier if we exercise regularly. When it comes to our brain and mood though, the connection isn’t so clear.
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fastcompany:

What Happens To Our Brains When We Exercise And How It Makes Us Happier

Most of us are aware of what happens to the body when we exercise. We build more muscle or more stamina. We feel how daily activities like climbing stairs becomes easier if we exercise regularly. When it comes to our brain and mood though, the connection isn’t so clear.

Read More>

White House Climate Change Data Portal Highlights Local Impacts

Career Rocket Fuel: Whether You’re A Millennial Or Eyeing Retirement, Here’s What You Really Need To Get Right About Work | Co.Create | Creativity + Culture + Commerce

In my book, marveling at the wonders of nature is really the only right way to spend the first weekend of spring. So glad the weather held out for my first visit to Snoqualmie Falls. #waterfalls #washington #nature #springishere  (at Snoqualmie Falls, Washington)

In my book, marveling at the wonders of nature is really the only right way to spend the first weekend of spring. So glad the weather held out for my first visit to Snoqualmie Falls. #waterfalls #washington #nature #springishere (at Snoqualmie Falls, Washington)

The first day of #spring needs #nofilter.

The first day of #spring needs #nofilter.

The recently installed “Luna Girls” sculpture on the West Seattle waterfront. The metal sculpture celebrates the history of Luna Park, the 12-acre amusement park built at Alki in 1907 but which closed shortly after in 1913. My verdict: LOVE IT. Looking at the piece feels a lot like walking into a still frame of a cartoon. If this doesn’t hearken to the carefree days of yesteryear, I don’t know what will. (at Luna Girls Sculpture)

The recently installed “Luna Girls” sculpture on the West Seattle waterfront. The metal sculpture celebrates the history of Luna Park, the 12-acre amusement park built at Alki in 1907 but which closed shortly after in 1913. My verdict: LOVE IT. Looking at the piece feels a lot like walking into a still frame of a cartoon. If this doesn’t hearken to the carefree days of yesteryear, I don’t know what will. (at Luna Girls Sculpture)

instagram:

Exploring the Big Four Ice Caves with @mattbg

To see more photos and videos of the Big Four Ice Caves, explore the Big Four Ice Caves location page.

Two hours outside of Seattle in the Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest, a natural spectacle draws Instagrammers to Big Four Mountain: ice caves. Created from years of cascading water, warm winds and avalanche-deposited snow, the Big Four Ice Caves first attracted Los Angeles Instagrammer Matt Gee (@mattbg) a year ago. As a lover of epic landscapes, Matt immediately knew he had to plan a visit: “This was one place that I absolutely had to see in person. The photos I saw conveyed such an otherworldly and unique landscape.”

"Photographing the caves was an incredible experience. There was a beautiful backdrop of snow-covered mountains and the cascading waterfalls surrounding the caves created an amazing soundtrack for the experience." Capturing the caves’ magnitude was particularly tricky—a problem Matt solved after being drawn to the texture of the cave walls as a backdrop for portraits. "It was really important to have people in my shots to give the photos some scale," Matt says. "It was great to have the subject wearing a pop of color against the cool blues and whites of the walls."

newsweek:

Kurt Vonnegut Diagrams the Shape of All Stories in a Master’s Thesis Rejected by U. Chicago (via Kurt Vonnegut Diagrams the Shape of All Stories in a Master’s Thesis Rejected by U. Chicago - Open Culture)

newsweek:

Kurt Vonnegut Diagrams the Shape of All Stories in a Master’s Thesis Rejected by U. Chicago (via Kurt Vonnegut Diagrams the Shape of All Stories in a Master’s Thesis Rejected by U. Chicago - Open Culture)

Four Questions to Ask About Each Draft

lettersandlight:

The “Now What?” Months are here! In 2014, we’ll be bringing you advice from authors who published their NaNo-novels, editors, agents, and more to help you polish November’s first draft until it gleams. Author Liz Coley guides you through four questions she asks about each of her manuscripts:

Come each November 30, I’ve usually got a 50,017-word manuscript with an inspired and page-turning start, a middle featuring holes or inconsistencies, and an end that feels like a mad dash to the last scene (because it was).

This document is what I call my “white room” draft. It lacks furniture and paint, or more specifically, well-interspersed action beats to break up the dialogue and well-integrated physical details of characters and setting. And frequently, though the foundation is good, it lacks a wall or two and a decent roof to cap it all off.

Since I started NaNoWriMo in 2006, I’ve developed a four-step revision cycle—beginning with Step Zero: take December to finish the story. With the new year, revising begins in earnest. Simply stated, four questions must be answered and satisfied:

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